Trinitarian Devotional Life

God’s desire for his presence to be with his people is a common theme throughout the Bible. In the beginning of the Bible, Genesis, we are told God walked with Adam and Eve (Genesis 3:8), but sin caused a separation between us and the presence of God. More could be said about God’s presence in the Old Testament with his people, but we see God’s presence with his people again in human form through Jesus the Christ, the Son of God. God walked among us in human flesh (John 1:14). But since Jesus ascended into heaven after his death and resurrection, the Holy Spirit is now with us (Ephesians 1:13-14). To put this all together, God desires to be with you and to have a relationship with you. And this relationship with God as we engage his presence is best seen in our devotional life. When we come to have our devotional/quiet time or whatever else you may call it, you desire to have communion with God. Communion is not just the Lord’s Supper, but it also means having an intimate relationship with God. And this is best seen in the doctrine of the trinity as we spend time with the God one God who has revealed himself to us as three persons.

We Commune As Adopted Sons and Daughters of God the Father

Romans 8:14-17 teaches we have been adopted by God. When sin caused a separation between us and God, it caused us to be a slave to sin. A slave during the Roman period was different from slavery in America. During the Roman period you were a slave to pay off a debt and not forced into slavery with no rights. Our debt as slaves of sin is we cannot pay anything to make our debt of sin go away. But through Jesus we have been adopted as sons and daughters of God. We have been given a new life and our relationship with God is secured because those of the Christian faith get to call God “My Father”. We get to approach God as our Father in our relationship with him. A Father who will be there for us.

We Commune Because of the Mediation of God the Son

Without Jesus, we would not even have a relationship with God. 1 Timothy 2:5-6 teaches Jesus became the mediator, the point person, in reestablishing the relationship between God and man. How did Jesus do this? He did this by dying on the cross for our sins and defeating death by rising from the grave. Sin caused a separation between us and God, but now the blood of Jesus covers the wrong we have committed against God and we now stand in God’s forgiveness. Death is the penalty of our sins, though we still die physically, we will be raised to new life to be with God forever because Jesus rose from the grave and God will raise those up from the dead who believe in Jesus for salvation (John 3:17-18).

We Commune Through the Presence of God the Holy Spirit

Because the Holy Spirit lives inside of us (2 Timothy 1:14), we have this constant access to God. 2 Peter 1:21 teaches this about the Holy Spirit: he shows us what is from God. We are able to speak to God and hear God through what the Spirit is communicating to us. Paul testified to having fellowship with the Holy Spirit (2 Corinthians 13:13) because he knew the Holy Spirit as a person and not a tool for selfish gain.

How Does This Change Our Devotional Life?

When we see God as our Father, we know we will be in good hands of what we ask (Matthew 7:7-12). When we see Jesus as our mediator, we see we now have full access to God because of the death and resurrection of Jesus (Matthew 27:50-51). And when we realize the Holy Spirit is God’s presence with us, then we will find true joy (Romans 14:17). Can you say this is true of your devotional life? Are you engaging the presence of God?

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